THE GUIDE

Insider Secrets of Luxury Travel

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PICTURE PERFECT

How to Photograph Animals

Award-winning photographer and QUEST contributor, Mark Edward Harris, has traveled to 98 countries and six continents, capturing images of elusive, wild creatures at their most serene and spontaneous. Here, he shares how to get the best photo, whatever your skills.

QUEST: Where are the best places on Earth you’ve taken pictures of wildlife? 

Mark Edward Harris: Japan is fantastic for its red-crowned cranes in Hokkaido and snow monkeys in Nagano Prefecture in winter. Alaska is amazing for bears catching salmon trying to make their way upstream on the Brooks River in mid-summer. The Arctic and the area around Churchill are incredible for its Polar bears. Trekking to photograph gorillas in Rwanda is a very intense and rewarding experience because after a long hike you end up in extremely close proximity to these fellow great apes. Latin America offers everything from whales and other sea life around Baja to parrots in a giant sink hole near Bonito, Brazil. We are so fortunate to live on a planet with so much diversity. We just have to make sure that we take care of it to the best of our abilities.

When traveling somewhere with the intention of photographing wildlife, which pieces of camera equipment are must-haves? 

Photographing wildlife is not as much about cameras as it is about lenses. The newest smart phones can take great panoramas and portraits in the right hands but are not the right tools for wildlife where extreme long lenses are the name of the game. It’s not uncommon to see pros and serious amateurs toting around 400mm to 600mm lenses. These lenses are huge in order to allow enough light in so that a shot can be taken without having to bump up the ISO to a very digital noise-inducing level. 

How do you capture an emotional quality in an up-close animal portrait?

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One of the main reasons for using extremely long lenses in wildlife photography is to capture an image of an animal in its native environment without disturbing it. If you can photograph their eyes, the viewers can glimpse into the window to the souls. That expression is not just reserved for humans. With fast lenses, meaning a lens that can open to a wide aperture such as f/2.8, we can focus our lenses on their eyes and let the background drop out of focus by using a shallow depth of field. This technique creates an image that helps us connect with the animal before our lens, at least on a visual level. The background in this technique is called “bokeh” — the quality of out of focusness. It comes from the Japanese word “boke.” Less expensive telephoto lenses do not maintain a wide enough aperture to get as powerful a bokeh as the top of the line fast lenses, but the reality is most people do not want to spend $8,000 on a lens that is heavy and cumbersome.  It’s a balancing act, and there’s nothing wrong with someone opting to travel with a smaller lens that doesn’t break the bank or the back. 

Is capturing a great moment luck or technique? 

Most of it comes from experience and a professional approach. First, know the equipment in your hands and gain basic knowledge of photo technique. I cover this in depth in my book, “The Travel Photo Essay: Describing a Journey Through Images.” I emphasize in my workshops that a photographer who wants to take professional-looking images needs to approach the field just as a person would in any other profession. They need to learn their tools of the trade. When it comes to technique, having a firm grasp of the exposure triangle — shutter speed, aperture and ISO, and how they relate to each other — is a good start. 

How do you capture the drama in an action shot?

The keys to capturing the decisive moment in wildlife photography is being in the right place at the right time and using a fast-enough shutter speed to capture the action. For instance, I used a shutter speed of 1/2000th of a second to freeze the salmon about to be caught by the grizzly above Brooks Falls. For these situations, it’s often best to work in shutter priority. 

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What tips do you have for shooting up-close?

Macro lenses are the key to photographing all sorts of smaller creatures from butterflies to tarsiers. It’s a great lens to have in the bag.

Where to next and what do you hope to capture in an image?

I’m heading to Southeast Asia to continue my series of orangutan portraits. While the future for many species is uncertain, orangutans in the wild are hanging on by a particularly thin vine. Their populations have declined significantly over the past hundred years in large measure due to habitat destruction in their native Sumatra and Borneo where forests give way to palm oil plantations. But palm oil production can be done sustainably without destroying forests and consumers can support these efforts by using products that have a RSPO (Sustainable Palm Oil) label or the Green Palm label, the latter indicating a product in support of the transition to certified palm oil. 

Instagram: @MarkEdwardHarrisPhoto | Website: www.MarkEdwardHarris.com


ABOUT FACE

Leave your beauty arsenal at home and pack a cult favorite product — made in Napa Valley — that keeps skin balanced on the move.

Active Botanical Serum by Vintner’s Daughter in 5 ml travel size | $65

vintnersdaughter.com

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MINIMALISM TO GO

Travel accessories and multitasking take-alongs have gotten sleeker and stronger, without sacrificing a single ounce of chic. In an Instagram world, the new status symbols are logo-less wonders that work hard and keep you looking sharp. 

 Water-resistant nylon, clean lines, ample compartments and a flat bottom make a compact duffle that fits under-seat on a plane without gobbling up legroom.  The Everywhere Bag by AWAY | $195  awaytravel.com

Water-resistant nylon, clean lines, ample compartments and a flat bottom make a compact duffle that fits under-seat on a plane without gobbling up legroom.

The Everywhere Bag by AWAY | $195 awaytravel.com

 Chargers, no matter how small, can be cumbersome. This multitasking, portable power bank is the sleek, gold standard — crush-proof, allows you to charge your devices while charging an external battery and can keep 95% of its charge for up to 6 months.  Zendure A5 Portable Charger | $60 |  zendure.com

Chargers, no matter how small, can be cumbersome. This multitasking, portable power bank is the sleek, gold standard — crush-proof, allows you to charge your devices while charging an external battery and can keep 95% of its charge for up to 6 months.

Zendure A5 Portable Charger | $60 | zendure.com

 A sturdy straw bag (handwoven in Ghana) with an added shoulder strap looks smart while traveling and suits any destination, from lounging on the beach to picnicking by the Seine to shopping in the souk.  Medium Caba Straw Tote by MUUÑ | $215  lagarconne.com  and  netaporter.com

A sturdy straw bag (handwoven in Ghana) with an added shoulder strap looks smart while traveling and suits any destination, from lounging on the beach to picnicking by the Seine to shopping in the souk.

Medium Caba Straw Tote by MUUÑ | $215 lagarconne.com and netaporter.com

 Inspired by 1960s automotive culture, this affordable timepiece quietly steals attention with its classic blend of form and function. Choose from a variety of straps.  Blacktop Series 47mm Watch in Silver Mist by MVMT | $185 |  mvmtwatches.com

Inspired by 1960s automotive culture, this affordable timepiece quietly steals attention with its classic blend of form and function. Choose from a variety of straps.

Blacktop Series 47mm Watch in Silver Mist by MVMT | $185 | mvmtwatches.com


NEXT UP: GO ECO

As travelers become more aware of the environmental impacts of tourism on destinations, Ker & Downey recommends more roads less traveled. Here are three to see now.

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MOZAMBIQUE

Off the beaten path, southern Africa’s remote and sparsely-touristed seaside marvel gives way to some of the planet’s most singular experiences and sights, such as the marine animals, bird species and wild horses that thrive on the six islands of the Bazaruto Archipelago. Traced by the Indian Ocean, the pristine coastline offers sparkling sand and views of the sea often dotted with colorful dhows afloat above vibrant corals and abundant sea life. While the country is home to wetlands, forests and savannahs, underwater safari is where it’s at, making Mozambique an ideal place to view sea life in the vast and purest of blues. The islands and islets of the seemingly-boundless Quirimbas Archipelago and Quirimbas National Park are virtually undiscovered. Beyond the sea, the sleepy seaside villages of Nampula Province beckon discovery of authentic local life.

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NORWAY

As if an arresting, dramatic natural landscape carved by fjords and massive, snow-capped mountains and hidden glassy lakes isn’t reason enough to visit, this Scandinavian country is also known for the world’s highest standard of living and fair quality of life for its inhabitants. From quaint fishing villages to rare and unusual wildlife to the heritage of Viking sagas, it’s easy to explore all, leaving a minimal environmental footprint. A perfect fit for all levels of sustainable adventure — kayaking, hiking, arctic whale watching, glacier viewing, fishing and foraging, skiing or chasing the Northern Lights — this is a bucket list destination that remains under the radar just enough that you often feel you have the whole world to yourself.

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COSTA RICA 

A land thick with dense wildlife-packed jungles, otherworldly cloud forests, UNESCO World Heritage Sites and uncrowded, unspoiled beaches on the Pacific and Caribbean sides — Costa Rica is rich with ecozones. Visit and you’ll often hear the words “pura vida,” the national ethos of living simply, optimistically and stress free with abiding gratitude for the country’s prolific natural and cultural gifts. Think cascading waterfalls, towering volcanic mountains and steamy thermal spas, as well as the alluring colonial city of San José. Boasting some of Latin America’s most innovative environmental policies, Costa Rica has turned small-scale ecotourism into high art, with luxury glamping experiences that are at the forefront of water and wildlife conservation, and even agroforestry.